Cleaner Water, Healthier Birds

By Rob Larose, CEO of BioSafe Systems

With public consumers’ changing opinions on the use of antibiotics there is increased pressure for producers to find new ways to grow healthy flocks. The value of a clean, safe water supply is an often-overlooked resource in poultry production.

Chickens intake almost twice as much water as they do feed and the more they grow, the more water they drink. On average, daily water consumption can range from one to ten gallons per 1,000 birds depending on the season. Warmer months provide the perfect conditions for water infections like algae, bacteria, and fungi to become established along with the formation of biofilms which can harbor pathogens that can affect overall water quality as well as reduce the flow of water

Dissolved minerals can contribute to the growth of biofilms and increase the possibility of blockages. Even a low-grade build-up of mineral residue can limit water flow and result in less-than-adequate consumption for optimal bird growth and feed conversion.

Water tests performed by a reputable lab can be an invaluable tool for identifying the source of performance problems. On-farm tests can also be helpful for monitoring and improving water quality.  These tests will not only indicate levels of biological contaminants and dissolved minerals but will help to identify when increased treatment options should be enacted to correct problems.

Traditional chemistries used to treat water may not be up to the modern-day task. Chlorine and hydrogen peroxide historically have performed poorly on removing mineral build-ups. Methods used in various industries such as food processing and dairies may provide some answers. Products specially formulated to dissolve and liquefy minerals are best used in conjunction with high-level products with proven efficacy in eradicating biofilms as well as sanitizing and disinfecting the water supply. Peracetic acid based chemistries are quickly becoming the sought-after method for eliminating water system impurities. They can be used in all seasons, leave no residue, and are proven effective against algae, bacteria, and biofilms.

The use of these simple, yet effective systems and biofilm treatment products will keep water quality high, reduce latent infections, and ultimately increase production on all levels.

BioSafe is one of the largest manufacturers of peracetic acid (PAA) in North America providing sustainable disease control products to customers within the animal health, meat/poultry processing and egg industries.

BioSafe Systems adds to their Engineering Team

EAST HARTFORD, CT – BioSafe announces the strategic hire of Sannel Patel as a Process Engineer. Patel’s main objectives will be improving existing manufacturing mechanisms and spearheading the commercialization of a BioSafe’s new manufacturing process, OxyFusion. His work will cover all BioSafe segments with a strong focus on Post-Harvest/Food Safety and Meat & Poultry industries.

Sannel was born in India but was raised in Botswana, Africa where he developed a love for cricket. He was offered university scholarships to play in both England and India but chose to attend Iowa State University where he received a degree in Chemical Engineering. Most recently he worked with Ozone Solutions in Iowa as a chemical engineer and technical sales manager. He will be relocating to Connecticut and be working out of BioSafe’s headquarters in East Hartford.

BioSafe is excited to welcome Sannel. For more information contact BioSafe Systems toll-free at 888-273-3088 or visit www.biosafesystems.com

 

Tips to Control Lice and Mites on Poultry

Published with permission by Poultry Times.  Originally posted on August 21, 2017.

By Dr. Dan Cunningham

Special to Poultry Times

ATHENS, Ga. — Ectoparasites (e.g. lice & mites) are often a problem for small flock producers. These insects are extremely small (about the size of a pin head) and difficult to detect unless one knows how and where to look for these pests.

Even though they are very small and not easily noticed, they can cause problems for caretakers as well as the birds themselves. Heavily infested flocks can suffer substantial economic losses as a result of reductions in egg production, reduced weight gains, lower hatchability, increased feed costs and increased mortality.

Poultry workers may experience the uncomfortable conditions of numerous bites and skin rashes. The following is useful information for controlling these parasites in small flocks:

Northern Fowl Mite (white, gray, black or red in color)

Hosts include wild birds and rodents as well as poultry.
Infestations can occur at any time of the year.
Mites generally spend their entire life on or near the host.
Life cycle can be complete in as little as 5 days.
Chicken Mites (white, gray, black or red in color)

Hosts include wild birds (pigeons are a popular host) as well as poultry.
Hide off hosts during the day in nest boxes, cracks and crevices. Feed on hosts at night.
Life cycle can be complete in as little as seven days.
Workers may experience bites, itching or rashes.
Chicken Body Louse (yellowish color, flat body)

Spends it entire life on the chicken. No other hosts.
Chewing lice that feed on skin and feathers.
Life cycle is complete in 18 to 21 days.
Generally found around the vent area.
Management

It is not difficult to monitor birds in a small flock on a regular basis. Birds and nests should be checked at least monthly for signs of lice or mites. More frequent monitoring may be needed if the problem is severe.

Check birds at the base of the feathers and around the vent area for adult lice and mites or for evidence of eggs. Eggs may appear as dirty gray areas at the base of the feathers, particularly around the vent.
Look for evidence of lesions or skin irritation anywhere on the body of the bird.
Examine nest boxes for evidence of mites. Mites may be seen as rapidly moving specks on the nesting material or the hands. A flash light may be helpful in looking for these pests.
Be alert for unexplained rashes, itching or other skin disorders on workers.
Treatment

The most common treatment for poultry lice and mites for small flock owners is the use of a dust powder or spray solution. Permethrin and tetrachlorvinphos are insecticides commonly used for treating poultry with ectoparasites. These insecticides can be found in dust or spray applications in most farm animal supply stores and can be applied directly to the birds or to treat nests. Permethrin strips that can be hung in the pens are also available for lice and mite control. Regardless of which insecticide is used, it is important to follow label instructions.

Bird Application — To ensure proper treatment, it is important that all birds be treated. The insecticide must be applied so that it penetrates to the skin. Thorough application of the insecticide to the base of the feathers of all birds will be required. In addition, a follow up application will be necessary to kill newly hatched larvae. Eggs of ectoparsites are unaffected by these insecticides.
Application to Premises — When applying insecticides for ectoparasites, the material should be applied to areas where these pests hide. Thus, nest boxes, side and end walls, cages and other stationary equipment should be treated. As with direct application to the birds, a second application to kill parasites that may have hatched following treatment will be necessary.
Individuals should always follow label instruction on interval usage and application rates for pesticides. All pesticides are most effective when applied to clean facilities.

Controlling ectoparasites in poultry flocks will result in healthier and more economically productive birds for the pleasure and benefit of your family.

Dr. Dan Cunningham is a retired professor of poultry science with the University of Georgia’s Department of Poultry Science in Athens, Ga.

Introducing New AzaGuard Formulation from BioSafe Systems

EAST HARTFORD, CT – BioSafe Systems is excited to announce the release of a new and improved formulation of AzaGuard Insecticide/Nematicide. A common inert used in emulsified concentrates was recently put on the EPA watch list. To be proactive, BioSafe Systems underwent the process of reformulating AzaGuard and updating the label through the EPA to produce a more sustainable botanical insecticide which adheres to the company’s mission of providing highly effective but sustainable crop protection solutions. Additionally, over 30 new crops were added to the label including arugula, globe artichokes, pomegranates and cranberries to meet the increasing need for effective organic insect control solutions.

AzaGuard is a 3% Azadirachtin Botanical Insecticide utilizing the technical material that remains below 20% by weight to maintain high levels of other important limonoids. The inclusion of these important limonoids in AzaGuard enhances the efficacy of the active ingredient as an insect growth regulator, insect repellant and anti-feedant. In addition, AzaGuard is formulated in the U.S. under strict quality control conditions from technical material extracted from newly harvested neem seeds. These manufacturing efforts ensure that AzaGuard maintains the maximum potency until used by our customers.

For more information or a copy of the updated AzaGuard label, contact BioSafe Systems toll-free at 888-273-3088 or visit biosafesystems.com.

Our Team Grows By Two New Members

EAST HARTFORD, CT – BioSafe Systems announces the strategic hires of Kyle Pickles as the Technical Sales Representative for the California Central Coast and Steven Tillman as the Midwest Technical Sales Rep. Both will work in the Agriculture market segment.

Kyle Pickles is based on the Central California Coast as a Technical Sales Representative. He is a graduate of California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, with a BS degree in Agriculture Systems Management and a minor in Plant Protection and Crop Science. Kyle started his career in the water treatment services division of the Deerpoint Group but quickly decided his passion was working directly it growers and transitioned into a position with Helena Chemical Company. Kyle is eager to provide a high level of technical support and service to the Central Coast territory covering Oxnard/Ventura up to the Salinas Valley.

Steven Tillman lives in northern Indiana and will cover the Midwest where he has extensive regional agricultural knowledge. Steven graduated from Purdue University with a Bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Business Management and a minor in Agronomy. He then began working on retain agriculture for Ag Plus Inc. where he provided growers with customized fertilizer recommendations. Next, he transitioned to a Territory Sales Manager role at Compass Minerals International Inc. where he managed an 8-state trade territory, calling on retail agriculture establishments. Before coming to BioSafe, Steven was an Account Relationship Manager for North Central Co-Op. We are excited to have him bring his extensive expertise to our team.

BioSafe is excited to welcome these new members and is pleased to have them as part of our family. For more information, contact BioSafe Systems toll-free at 888-273-3088 or visit biosafesystems.com.

Growing Our Midwest Technical Team

EAST HARTFORD, CT – BioSafe Systems is excited to announce the strategic hire of Steven Tillman as a Technical Sales Representative for Midwestern United States.  With extensive experience and regional agricultural knowledge, Steven will be a great asset to the team.

Steven graduated from Purdue University with a Bachelor’s Degree in Agricultural Business Management and a minor in Agronomy. He then began working in retail agriculture for Ag Plus. Inc. as an Agronomy Sales and Technology Specialist where he provided growers with customized fertilizer recommendations based on their personalized needs. Steven then became a Territory Sales Manager for Compass Minerals Internationals Inc., where he managed an 8-state trade territory, calling on retail agriculture establishments. Before coming to BioSafe, Steven was an Account Relationship Manager for North Central Co-Op.

Steven is based in northern Indiana with his wife, Liz, near the “home farm” where he grew up farming grain and beef cattle. He is excited to come into BioSafe, a family-owned company, with a great understanding of how a family-run business operates. When he’s not working, Steven spends his time on the basketball court volunteering as a basketball coach for high school athletes. He also finds a little time on the tractor to be therapeutic. BioSafe Systems welcomes Steven and is pleased to have him as part of our family.

For more information, contact BioSafe Systems toll-free at 888-273-3088 or visit biosafesystems.com.

International Poultry Council Adopts Position Statement on Antimicrobial Usage

Published with permission by Poultry Times.  Originally posted on June 19, 2017.

STONE MOUNTAIN, Ga. — In a landmark decision, the International Poultry Council has adopted a position statement on the responsible and efficacious use of antimicrobials in global poultry production.

The statement sets a science-based course for the global poultry industry to follow that safeguards the efficacy of antimicrobial usage while at the same time addressing the issues of resistance, bird welfare, food safety, and concerns of consumers, the council noted.

“The IPC acknowledges antimicrobial resistance is a global concern and that the poultry industry must adopt management practices that reduce the use of those antimicrobials for which resistance could pose the greatest global risk,” said IPC President Jim Sumner. “We also should educate the public about these practices.”

Sumner said the statement encourages the global poultry sector to be proactive in its engagement with its stakeholders and “to implement practices that advance the ‘one health’ objectives that lead to healthy people, healthy animals, and a healthy planet.”

Members of the IPC began discussions on a position statement on antimicrobials at the organization’s second semester 2016 meeting in Portugal, and concluded work on the document at its most recent meeting in Cartagena, Colombia, in April.

“Stewardship in antimicrobial use is essential,” said Ricardo Santin of ABPA, the Brazilian Animal Protein Association. “As a sector, we must understand and control why and when we use antimicrobials, which antimicrobials we use, how much antimicrobials we use, and transparently communicate our actions”

Santin said that the industry must set its priorities for antimicrobial use in order to strike a balance between reducing the need for these compounds and providing the best possible care for its animals.

The IPC noted that it also recognizes the ethical obligation of farmers and their veterinarians to protect the health and welfare of the birds in their care, which may include the responsible use of antimicrobials. They emphasized that the poultry supply chain globally has a responsibility to ensure that it minimizes the industry’s potential contribution to the development of antimicrobial resistance.

 “We discussed and strongly recommend that all antimicrobials will only be used in compliance with national authorizations, and that those antimicrobials critically important for human medicine should be used for therapeutic purposes only and under a supervising veterinarian’s diagnosis and oversight,” said Prasert Anuchiracheeva, secretary general of the Thai Broiler Processing Exporters Association.

“We do not yet have all the answers as to the extent by which the use of antimicrobials in livestock production contribute to antimicrobial resistance,” said Paul Lopez, president of a.v.e.c., the European poultry association. “But we know that the IPC has a key leadership role in understanding and minimizing the poultry sector’s impact. IPC members have a responsibility to produce safe, wholesome, and nutritious food, and within that is a duty to the best health and welfare of their birds.”

Sumner said that the IPC and its members will actively engage with intergovernmental organizations, with governments, and with stakeholders to help shape public policy to address antimicrobial resistance.

“We look forward to working with World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN, the World Health Organization, and the Codex Alimentarius Commission to ensure that we collaboratively address the need to use all antimicrobials responsibly, and only when needed,” he said.

BioSafe Partners with Other Industry Leaders and NIOSH in Discussions Regarding Peracetic Acid (PAA)

EAST HARTFORD, Connecticut – BioSafe Systems, a member of the Peroxy Compounds Task Force (PCTF) – Peracetic Acid Group which consists of PAA manufacturers, along with the National Chicken Council and Aseptic and the Antimicrobial Processing and Packaging Association (AAPPA) is working in collaboration with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) on setting a new proposed Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) value for airborne peroxyacetic acid in various commercial operations.

BioSafe Systems and most other members of the PCTF – Peracetic Acid Group believe the peracetic acid (IDLH) value proposed by NIOSH is overly conservative and not based upon sound science. The PCTF is working with NIOSH to increase the proposed (IDLH) value by providing relevant data and information.

The current NIOSH proposal would increase cost and add inconvenience for hatcheries, farms and plants using peracetic acid. PAA atmospheric monitors will likely be required and results tracked in addition to added Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).  Affected industries include poultry, beef, swine and vegetable processing, aseptic packaging operations, hospitals and commercial disinfection operations.

BioSafe is concerned about worker safety and we are working with the meat and poultry industry to minimize potential exposure to employees and USDA inspectors, and with NIOSH to set an IDLH value based on scientifically supported data.

 

For questions about this press release please call 888-273-3088.

BioSafe Systems: Growing our East Coast Technical Team

EAST HARTFORD, CT, April 13 – BioSafe Systems is proud to announce the strategic hire of Patrick Clark, as a Technical Sales Representative for the Northeast territory of the United States.  He brings with him an extensive experience and regional knowledge of the agriculture market.

Patrick served as a business unit agronomist for Helena Chemical Company where he provided agronomic and precision agriculture support in the eastern half of the US. He was also employed by Marrone Bio Innovations as a sales representative in the Northeast & Great Lakes regions. Prior to that, he was the general manager of a wholesale nursery servicing the ornamental and agriculture markets in the Northern California, Western Nevada, and Southern Oregon markets. Patrick holds three Associate of Agriculture Science degrees from Butte-Glen Community College and a Bachelor’s Degree in Agriculture Science: Crops, Horticulture, & Land Resource Management from California State University – Chico, CA. 

He will be based in the greater Philadelphia area and is advantageously located to best support the Northeastern US territory via travel. In Patrick’s spare time, he enjoys camping/hiking, backpacking, kayaking, fishing, and hunting. He is an avid reader of history and science based subjects, and he thoroughly enjoys travelling and exploring new cultures. Additionally, Patrick volunteers his time at a local community garden project as well as hosting mini-seminars there to home gardeners on a wide range of agricultural and horticultural topics. BioSafe Systems welcomes Patrick and is pleased to have him as a part of the family.

For more information, contact BioSafe Systems toll-free at 888-273-3088

MOVING BEYOND METHYL BROMIDE

USDA Awards $9.4 Million for Safer, More Effective Pest Management

retrieved from: http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?contentid=2016/11/0243.xml&contentidonly=true

 

WASHINGTON, Nov. 16, 2016 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today awarded $9.4 million to support 25 research and outreach projects that will help mitigate pests, weeds and diseases on farms and in communities. The awards are made through NIFA’s Crop Protection and Pest Management Program (CPPM) and Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program which have awarded more than $64.5 million since 2014.

“NIFA is making investments to ensure America’s agriculture sector is able to rely on sound scientific approaches to increase production and ensure continued food security in the face of the many challenges including arthropod, weed and disease pests,” said NIFA Director Sonny Ramaswamy. “The Crop Protection and Pest Management Program has a history of developing new tools, best management practices and strategies for healthy crop systems while supporting communities with effective, affordable and environmentally sound solutions that reduce potential health risks.”

Using a grant announced today, a University of Minnesota research team will scout for soybean pests using unmanned aerial vehicles to read light waves reflected off the soybean foliage. A North Carolina State University team will develop practices to improve growth and survival of urban trees. Pennsylvania State University will use a grant to adapt novel nanotube technology to make it possible to diagnose pest infections early and protect crops. Washington State University will develop integrated pest management strategies for the rapidly expanding U.S. hops industry.

NIFA’s CPPM and IPM investments are made through several programs. The Applied Research and Development Program Area (ARDP), which invests in high priority pest management projects that encourage adoption and implementation of new IPM technologies. The Promoting IPM in Affordable Housing grant provides IPM technical assistance services and training sessions to public housing authorities and other housing providers. The Methyl Bromide Transition (MBT) program helps to discover and implement practical and environmentally friendly pest management alternatives to transition from this older pesticide. The National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN) is a nationwide group of diagnostic laboratories that collaborate on early detection, identification and reporting of plant disease pathogens, especially those that may be biosecurity risks.

2016 ARDP recipients include:

  • Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo., $324,517
  • University of Georgia, Athens, Ga., $324,615
  • Regents of the University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minn., $324,880
  • Montana State University, Bozeman, Mont., $325,000
  • Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., $324,856
  • Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., $189,273
  • North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C., $324,979
  • North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C., $199,590
  • Oregon State University, Corvallis, Ore., $215,460
  • Pennsylvania State University, State College, Penn., $325,000
  • Texas A&M AgriLife Research, College Station, Texas, $289,281
  • University of Vermont and State Agricultural College, Burlington, Vt., $324,560
  • Washington State University, Pullman, Wash., $324,983
  • Washington State University, Pullman, Wash., $323,491

Project details can be found on the NIFA website.

2016 Promoting IPM in Affordable Housing recipient is:

  • Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., $363,636

Project details can be found on the NIFA website.

2016 Methyl Bromide Transition recipients include:

  • The Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz, Calif., $497,965
  • University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla., $472,506
  • Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kan., $499,999
  • Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich., $418,313

Project details can be found on the NIFA website.

2016 National Plant Diagnostic Network recipients include:

  • University of California, Davis, Calif., $539,983
  • University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla., $539,983
  • Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind., $207,135
  • Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kan., $539,983
  • Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich. $587,543
  • Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., $616,033

Project details can be found on the NIFA website.

Since 2009, USDA has invested $19 billion in research both intramural and extramural. During that time, research conducted by USDA scientists has resulted in 883 patent applications filed, 405 patents issued and 1,151 new inventions disclosures covering a wide range of topics and discoveries. To learn more about how USDA supports cutting edge science and innovation, visit the USDA Medium chapter Food and Ag Science Will Shape Our Future.

NIFA invests in and advances innovative and transformative research, education, and extension to solve societal challenges and ensure the long-term viability of agriculture. NIFA support for the best and brightest scientists and extension personnel have resulted in user-inspired, groundbreaking discoveries that are combating childhood obesity, improving and sustaining rural economic growth, addressing water availability issues, increasing food production, finding new sources of energy, mitigating climate variability and ensuring food safety.